Race Among Medical Devices and Doctors: Analysis

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Originally posted on ScienceRoll:

For some time now, I’ve been forming a think tank that would focus on issues related to the future of medicine. As a first step, we decided to address the issue of the changing world of medical devices and how such changes might affect the lives of medical professionals and patients. Please feel free to comment on this analysis.

If we take a look at the possible scripts of the market competition in the health sector, we can make few predictions on the patients’ experience. The competition among the medical device manufacturers and the globalized competition among the high skilled health workers have significant social effects.

There are heterogeneous, jammed and loud worlds like in the motion picture Fifth Element, where many types of doctors and devices form the healthcare system. There could be a low-end/high end distinct health market, where the wealthy ones could afford a real-life practice, but the…

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The Economic Burden of Chronic Disease

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Quoting:

“In its groundbreaking study, “An Unhealthy America: The Economic Impact of Chronic Disease,” the Milken Institute details the enormous financial impact of chronic disease on the U.S. economy – not only in treatment costs, but lost worker productivity – today and in the decades ahead. It also describes the huge savings if a serious effort were made to improve Americans’ health. Click on any of the links on this page to view the data by that category.

This study brings to light for the first time what is often overlooked in the discussion of the impact of chronic disease – the economic loss associated with preventable illness and the cost to the nation’s GDP and American businesses in lost growth. The study is the first of its kind to estimate the avoidable costs if a serious effort were made to improve Americans’ health

Source: 
http://www.chronicdiseaseimpact.com/

Related:

Europe Healthier Than U.S. >> (LA Times)

Healthy Living Could Save the U.S. $1 Trillion >> (LA Times) (A drop in the bucked compared to how much we spend on the current wars – see the National Priorities Project.)
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-Daniel Montano
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Keyword: Daniel Montano, Dan Montano, user experience design, information architect

Schools Near Freeways Unhealthy

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Health experts are warning that school campuses being built near freeways could put students at risk of asthma and other problems caused by road pollutants.Five school buildings are under construction within 500 feet of freeways in different parts of the city, with two more campuses near highways in the planning stages, the Los Angeles Times reported Monday.

Source:

Teacher Magazine: LA Schools Near Freeways Unhealthy

Related:

Schools to be Built Near Freeways Despite Health Thread >> (Planetizen)

More LA Schools Planned Near Freeways >> (Science Daily)
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-Daniel Montano
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Keyword: Daniel Montano, Dan Montano, user experience design, information architect

Bush vetoes popular bill on kids’ health care

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“WASHINGTON (Reuters) – President George W. Bush on Wednesday vetoed a measure to expand a popular children’s health care program, launching the first in a series of major battles with Democrats over domestic spending.”

Bush vetoes popular bill on kids’ health care | Health | Reuters

Blogged with Flock

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-Daniel Montano
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Keyword: Daniel Montano, Dan Montano, user experience design, information architect

War Vets Show Brain-Volume Deficits

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“COGNITIVE DISSONANCE: Researchers discovered learning disabilities and smaller brain volumes in soldiers suffering from several health-related symptoms upon their return from the first Gulf War.”

Link
Scientific American, May 18th, 2007: Go to the article >>
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-Daniel Montano
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Keyword: Daniel Montano, Dan Montano, user experience design, information architect