Solving complex problems: Education for all?

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In the 1980’s the artist Joseph Beuys proposed the “Free International University”. A project that would request educated individuals to share their knowledge with the world. It was a project that would require everyone to take an “elder-like” role to teach our neighbors, to share the basic form of human energy we call education.

Today we have business leaders like Scott McNealy, chairman of Sun Microsystems, paving the way to a similar effort for the K-12 range of education.

The following is quoted from curriki.org a project founded by Scott McNealy.

“A Few Words from Scott McNealy
Access to basic knowledge and learning tools for our children should never be proprietary. In fact, this can and should be a basic right of every child. Yet, over 100 million kids around the world do not have access to these primary education tools. We want to change this. The benefits to providing universal access to an education are endless.

At Curriki, the sole mission is to educate. By building a world class learning environment that is community developed and supported, and publishing it for free on the Web, Curriki works to ensure that anyone, from anywhere can participate.”

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2 thoughts on “Solving complex problems: Education for all?

  1. Howdy,

    A recent renewal of interest in online educational resources (and a bit-o-Googling) led me to your site. I am watching for Curriki.org to go live. I have even created a wiki to start some conversation about the space (what do we want, what do we need?):

    If you can spare a moment or three to share 2¢ about online curriculum development, please visit Curriki Workshop. (XWiki is the wiki engine that Curriki is deploying, so by posting at Curriki Workshop”, we can learn the wiki markup that will be in play once Curriki goes live.)

    Cheers.

  2. portjd

    Just a heads up to folks about what’s happening over at Curriki. The site has been adding content and updating tools so that members can develop, publish, and access open source curricula. The new Curriki.org includes something called the Currikulum Builder – it’s an editing tool that allows members to develop curriculum materials through a collaborative, wiki-based platform. Here’s an interesting lesson that one educator created using the Currikulum Builder:

    http://www.curriki.org/xwiki/bin/view/Coll_rmlucas/Stoichiometry

    There’s lots of great stuff and the more the community uses it, the better it will be. If you haven’t already, check it out.

    http://www.curriki.org

    -Bobbi Kurshan

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