Which strategies do you use for dealing with conflicting ideas?

Standard

The test of a first rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in the mind at the same time and still retain the ability to function. — F. Scott Fitzgerald (1930’s)

That was then.

Today, as we are exposed to different cultures, different politics, different customs, different philosophies….and the pace of information and change acceleratesthe challenge has been grown and multiplied.

Being able to function while holding two conflicting ideas is a good start — but it’s no longer enough.

We need to be able to be able to function while we hold thousands of conflicting and co-evolving ideas.

Education is not the learning of facts, but the training of the mind to think. -- Albert Einstein

Why is this important?

Whenever we run into opposing ideas we tend to think of them as roadblocks. We tend to give up thinking beyond the conflict.

We stop thinking.

We stop learning. 

It’s an artificial, self-imposed limit in human potential.

Our ability to move beyond these thinking roadblocks is one of the things that makes people better than computers.

We need to prepare to leave the relatively easy problems of logic and math to computers and graduate to harder problem-solving — the kind of problems humans are equipped to solve.

We just need to learn how.

(Is your school teaching you this? If not – demand it.)

Strategies for dealing with conflicting and opposable ideas

Here are some of the strategies that come to mind.

Please add your strategies in the comments for this blog post.

Which strategy do you use?

  • Context classification — (how do you detect context? and how do you classify?)
  • Time distribution — (how do you decide when and how to distribute?)
  • Change distribution — (how do you classify change and decide to distribute?)
  • Integration — (using “and” rather than “or”)
  • Analyzing contrasts and similarities between opposing ideas
  • Prioritizing — (based on what? How?)
  • Logical deconstruction – analyzing the logic behind the ideas
  • Other strategies?

What about you?

How do you manage conflicting ideas?

How do you navigate between them?

We are learning here. Prototyping ideas to deal with new challenges.

Add your comments  on this blog post

or feel free to email me: info@DanMontano.com

P.S.

I want to make sure you have realistic expectations. It’s likely I won’t be able to answer your questions until much later. Proceed with an assumption that you’ll be thinking along with anyone else who participates in the comments section.

Paper or pixels? Does the medium affect the way people read?

Aside

Paper or pixels? Does the medium affect the way people read?

Andrew Dillon Ph.D., the dean of the Graduate School of Information Science at the University of Texas has written a very interesting blog post on the nuances of online reading.

Reading beyond cognition

If you have been reading my blog for a while, you know that I’m interested in the topic of thinking on a holistic level. I consider systems thinking and embodied cognition milestones towards the goal of holistic thinking. Given that interest, I found Mr. Dillon’s comment at #2 in the list below a good reminder to what reading requires:

2) The act of reading involves all levels of human activity: physical, perceptual, cognitive and social. We tend to think of it only as a perceptual and cognitive act but materials must be located and handled, and the forms of information we share reflect cultural and behavioral norms of groups which manifest as genres and types. Any significant act of reading moves seamlessly among these levels of engagement.

The medium matters

Not all types of content should be consumed on the same medium. The medium matters. Your goals behind consuming the content also matters. Consider the following comment from the same article:

With most of the material we read during the working day and online, we often aren’t willing to commit to the full range and stop after scanning. Content providers know this and produce accordingly. Add to this the delivery of digital material on a platform that is constantly refreshing, updating and allows users to multi-task across applications, and the results are a series of short acts involving the perusal and reaction to messages and short form texts that break up the normal progression through deep reading tasks.

Is this bad? Not if your goal is to keep on top of changing contexts and identify facts. Yes if you want to read a novel or really study a technical report.

Read the whole article

This excerpt doesn’t do the original post any justice. I recommend reading the entire article: “Reading Online is Ruining My Life…” Graduate School of Information – University of Texas, blog post by Andrew Dillon Ph.D. Downloaded April 10, 2014 from: http://blogs.ischool.utexas.edu/infomatters/2014/04/10/reading-online-is-ruining-my-life

Listen to a related podcast

I also recommend listening to a recent NPR radio affiliate interview with Mr. Dillon titled: “Is reading online affecting your ability to learn?“. SCPR.org “Airtalk” by Larry Mantle, Downloaded on April 10, 2014.http://www.scpr.org/programs/airtalk/2014/04/10/36878/is-reading-online-affecting-our-ability-to-learn/

Reconsidering Bloom’s Taxonomy (diagrams)

Image

blooms_taxonomy_staircase reposted by Daniel Montano

Found in article: “Reconsidering Bloom’s Taxonomy” from: Learning Solutions Magazine

Bloom’s taxonomy staircase (Source: ftp://ftp-fc.sc.egov.usda.gov/NEDC/isd/taxonomy.pdf)


blooms_original_and_revised_taxonomies-png reposted by Daniel Montano

Found in article: “Reconsidering Bloom’s Taxonomy” from: Learning Solutions Magazine


Taxonomy for learning, teaching, and assessing: a revision of Bloom’s Taxonomy of Educational Objectives (Source: Iowa State University Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching; http:// www.celt.iastate.edu/pdfs-docs/teaching/RevisedBloomsHandout.pdf reposted by Daniel Montano

Figure 3: Taxonomy for learning, teaching, and assessing: a revision of Bloom’s Taxonomy of Educational Objectives
(Source: Iowa State University Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching; http://
www.celt.iastate.edu/pdfs-docs/teaching/RevisedBloomsHandout.pdf

All of these images found in article: “Reconsidering Bloom’s Taxonomy” from: Learning Solutions Magazine